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Religion as Practice and Discourse

Religion as Practice and Discourse

This emphasis channels research on religion(s) in both a diachronic and synchronic perspective. Scholarship in this area focuses on religious practices and the history of religion, as well as discourses within and on religions. The individual fields of research were developed in long-term projects with national and international visibility. Distinguished research centers and colleges (ZAR, IKGF) organize the fields’ interdisciplinary networks and cooperation within the faculty and beyond. Moreover, elite programs such as the successfully established master’s program “Ethics of Text Cultures” and the new degree in “Standards of Decision-Making across Cultures” further support the research emphasis’s interdisciplinary focus. Scholarship in this area is distinguished by research across religious and disciplinary boundaries: approaches in cultural studies, philology, and historiography are aligned to engage in fruitful discussions on diverse practices and discourses in different religions and in various historical and cultural contexts. Although the religious character of practices, objects, spaces, persons, and discourses has been and is being repeatedly attested, it is also possible to attest that religion rarely has been clearly defined. It is necessary to negotiate time and again what can be referred to as “religious.” Therefore, of importance are particularly questions regarding how orders, convictions, and practices attained a religious connotation. This can be researched both transculturally and transregionally. However, the research focus does not merely aim to develop a closed-off systematicity of how the religious is constructed. It promotes and interweaves individual research projects that analyze how that which is understood as “religion” transformed and was negotiated within its concrete historical contexts. To achieve this, the research focus provides a scholarly platform where diverse projects can be interwoven to stimulate interdisciplinary synergy. “Religion as Practice and Discourse” is a product of several joint research projects, such as the Research Unit “Sacrality,” and, since 2011, the Central Institute of the Anthropology of Religion(s) (ZAR). This is accompanied by intense discussion on possibly innovative thematic emphases regarding future joint research projects:

    Knowledge – Temporality – Cultural Comparison
    Concepts of Boundaries in the Middle East
    Cultural Difference and Transcontinental Connectivity in Antiquity

Projects:

Buchprojekt

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1. Introduction
Research evidence indicates that teachers’ personal beliefs (e.g.
worldview; anthropology; ethical convictions) are in correlation with
their professional thinking and acting. The following reasons suggest
that this is true especially for religious beliefs.
- In the psychology of religion, religious beliefs are conceived of
as particularly significant beliefs for religious persons that
potentially shape their whole lives.
- Normatively, educational operators with religious b…

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We know from existing empirical studies that young people with
migration and refugee background tend to be highly religious. For
refugee youth, however, the significance of their religiosity for their
life and their integration has hardly been the object of research. Nor
has the development of their religiosity in the context of their new
home country. It can be assumed that religiosity can function both as a
resource for better coping with life and integration as well as a risk
that…

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In the pre-modern societies of Europe and Asia, the sacral character of objects, spaces and personalities not only needed frequent reaffirmation; it was also open to doubt and even denial. This Research Unit, taking as its starting point the observation that sacrality is only rarely unambiguously defined, and in the vast majority of cases highly controversial and constantly subject to a process of negotiation and renegotiation, will investigate how people approached and dealt with the holy in…

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Die Debatte um Präsenz - verstanden als zeitliche und räumliche Gegenwart und Unmittelbarkeit - findet im internationalen Forschungskontext bisher auf die europäische Ideengeschichte beschränkt und dort ins-besondere auf ästhetische Diskurse fokussiert statt. Demgegenüber untersucht das Graduiertenkolleg „Prä-senz und implizites Wissen" in kulturvergleichender Perspektive kulturell divergente Formen der Diskursivie-rung von Präsenz in verschiedenen…

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22 refugee pupils in Nürnberg and Leipzig were interviewed on their religiosity and its significance for their flight and their integration.

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Choosing monasticism as the context of study, we choose a context in which holiness is explicitly postulated as an act of constitution and sacralization as a goal of this specific way of life. It is in the same time the context where the debate on the appropriateness of holy images, which is a central topic in Christian Theology and to be discussed in the context of non-christian dicourses on holy images, is intensified when in the early 12th century Bernard of Clairvaux criticized within the…

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Empirical research on Protestant Religious Education at Bavarian schools is still rare. This project will provide insight into the experience, attitides and opinions of RE teachers through a representative quantitative survey study. The focus is on the relationship between personal religiosity and teacher professionality as well as on more general questions abouth the significance of RE at Bavarian schools, the relationship of the different professional groups (ministers, church-paid religious…

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In the Christian context, the calling to contribute to the common good has increasingly been discussed under the label of “public theology”, and has led to the establishment of a “Global Network of Public Theology” (2007). In this discussion, the educational aspect has repeatedly been mentioned, but has remained marginal up to now. Other religions have their own traditions and perspectives, from which responsibility for society is motivated and reflected. The project intends…

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